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2016 Annual Meeting with ISFNR
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"How Miami Became the Capital of Affluent Latin America" 0 S. Larson Luis Fajardo, "How Miami Became the Capital of Affluent Latin America, BBC (May 16, 2016), http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-36281648
by S. Larson
Tuesday, May 17, 2016
"In Miami, Cuban Culture, No Passport Required" 0 S. Larson Colleen Creamer, "In Miami, Cuban Culture, No Passport Required," The New York Times (April 7, 2016), http://www.nytimes.com/2016/04/10/travel/little-havana-calle-ocho-miami.html?emc=eta1&_r=0 
by S. Larson
Wednesday, April 13, 2016
CFP: Panels on History of Public/Applied Folklore, Environmental Cultures 0 S. Larson The following is a call for participants for a sort of keynote forum session on the history of public/applied folklore work in and on environmental cultures that will look back across the field's environmental involvement from its early days to its futures. There are still a few spots available on that forum session, so if you've played a role in the history of this work and would like to join the conversation on public folklore's environmental past and futures, please contact the organizers (details below)! AND, the organizers also want to invite paper submissions for a panel (or two?!) highlighting recent and emerging folklore work in environmental humanities, broadly construed. The organizers particularly welcome submissions about projects and collaborations in public, applied, independent and community-based folklore practice; but would also welcome academic studies pertaining to environmental cultures, cultures of response to environmental crisis or climate change, or papers and projects thematizing the legacies of cultural conservation and public/applied folklore for environmental humanities work, or the implications of environmental humanities theory and methods for folk studies! The organizers welcome work in any geographic tradition and on or with any kind of group and are particularly interested in papers/projects that take up questions of method and collaboration across groups -- whether between folklorists and EPA/park/waste/environmental officials, communities affected by environmental injustice/preservation efforts, distant disciplines in the academy, multiple non-profits, etc. Also of interest are field papers or projects that take up the legacy of folklore's activist role and the ethical and political possibilities and pitfalls of environmental humanities and public/applied environmental cultures work as tools for advocacy, education, empowerment, and social change (and policy change), especially re: environmental justice. The organizers would be happy to provide more details or further suggestions. If you're interested, please contact them with your ideas by Thursday, March 10th, so as to allow plenty of time to meet the AFS submission deadline. Depending on response and folks' interest, the organizers would also be very willing to consider lightning round, open discussion/roundtable and other alternative AFS formats. Email ENVFOLK@gmail.com or feel free to reach out to the organizers individually at the addresses below, with any ideas or thoughts. Jess Lamar Reece Holler University of Pennsylvania Western Kentucky University jesslrh@sas.upenn.edu Bethani Turley The Ohio State University turley.48@osu.edu      
by S. Larson
Tuesday, March 8, 2016
CFP: "Folkloric Identity of Asian Americans" 0 S. Larson The Fall 2015 volume of the Journal of American Folklore grapples with the definition of Asian American folklore through "folkloric identity,” as defined by Juwen Zhang.  This innovative method analyzes folklore-in-practice occurring in diasporic, transnational contexts---wherever Asian Americans may live. The term provides a mode of analysis that moves away from racial/ethnic based studies of lore to focusing on the shared folklore practice occurring in a locale. Folkloric identity enables the study of Asian American cultural expressions focusing on the expressive practice itself, and not on ethnicity, race, religion or gender.   It is an approach that embraces the vitality and dynamism inherent in living folklore practices while it recognizes the fluidity of movement and technology’s impact on our lives in the 21st century. Because Asian American folklore has become a crucial aspect to the dynamic making/remaking of the Asian American identity as well as the identities of all Americans, the organizers of this panel seek papers that engage with the term "folkloric identity” of Asian Americans.  If you are interested in presenting a paper and joining an organized panel at AFS related to this theme, please submit your abstracts to Fariha Khan at fariha@sas.upenn.edu by March 20, 2016.  Papers may address, but are not limited to, definitions of Asian American folklore and shared practices in Asian American communities in the U.S. and beyond.  Such topics could include practices of migration, food, rituals, gender, and civic engagement.  Submissions will be considered for inclusion in a future edited volume on Asian American Folklore.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, March 8, 2016
Call for Forum Participants: Pop Up Museum on "Fieldwork Stories" 0 S. Larson A Pop Up Museum on the theme of "Fieldwork Stories” is proposed as a forum at the 2016 American Folklore Society Meeting in Miami. Chairs of the forum are Betty Belanus and Hanna Griff-Sleven.  The chairs are seeking four to six participants for the forum, interested in bringing an artifact from their fieldwork experience (or a photo or illustration of one if the actual artifact is too large or fragile to bring) to serve as models for the event.  There will also be a call for "audience participation” for those who wish to attend the forum and share an artifact and its story but who are committed to other AFS sessions and cannot be a formal part of this session.The Pop Up Museum is a concept developed by museologist Michelle del Carlo in 2011, and refined by others in the past five years.  A Pop Up Museum is a temporary display of objects around a theme, designed to encourage conversations and informal storytelling.   Participants are invited to bring an object that relates to the theme, write a label for the object, and interact with anyone who shows up at the event.  The concept is described and outlined thoroughly in this guide:http://popupmuseum.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/Pop-Up-Museum-Edited.pdfThe Pop Up Museum is a good model to share a common experience and stimulate meaningful conversations at the AFS meeting.  It will also encourage cross-disciplinary exchange between the AFS members and members of the co sponsoring organization, the International Society for Narrative Research.If you are interested in being a participant in the forum, please contact Betty Belanus at belanusb@si.edu.
by S. Larson
Thursday, March 3, 2016
“Cocaine Smuggled in Dead Babies and Miami’s Other Weirdest Urban Legends” 0 S. Larson Kyle Munzenrieder, "Cocaine Smuggled in Dead Babies and Miami’s Other Weirdest Urban Legends,” Miami New Times (February 18, 2016), http://www.miaminewtimes.com/news/cocaine-smuggled-in-dead-babies-and-miamis-other-weirdest-urban-legends-8257605
by S. Larson
Tuesday, March 1, 2016
CFP: "An Unfinished Story: Folklorists and the Creative Process" 0 S. Larson The following is a call for papers for one (or perhaps two) AFS 2016 sessions on the topic of "An Unfinished Story: Folklorists and the Creative Process." The organizers of this session(s) envision presenting selections from – and discussions of – current creative writing and storytelling projects that draw on folklore, giving special attention to the "unfinished” nature of the creative process. The aim for the session(s) is to stimulate creative conversations among folklorists, creative writers, and storytellers by presenting a mix of brief performances, readings, and analysis. Each participant might first, describe their current project and read/perform/share a section of it; then consider such matters as:What aspect of your creative process has been most productive for you in this project? Discuss one way that your practice of folklore has contributed to your creative process in this project. In what ways is your work "unfinished”?What are the characteristics of an "unfinished” work, for you? How does seeing your working drafts (and final drafts) as "unfinished” help or hinder your creative process in this project? If you see your work as unfinished, what, then, is an ending, for you? How do you "end” a piece of work? As to format, the organizers of this panel are thinking of experimenting (in rather flexible ways) with the recently-announced AFS short-paper format, in which presenters will speak for about 10 minutes, followed by 10 minutes of discussion. (This plan will allow for maximum discussion time, but unlike a forum, will foreground both presenters’ names and their topics in the program.) The organizers will be asking for co-sponsorship between the Storytelling Section and the Folklore and Creative Writing Section. Note: You need not be a member of one of these sections in order to take part in the session (though of course you are welcome to join if you wish!).Please let the organizers know if you are interested in taking part – and give a brief idea of what you would like to present and in what ways it might shed light on "the unfinished nature of the creative process.” Please email the organizers at the addresses below no later than Friday, March 4, so that there is plenty of time to plan and submit the proposals.Jo Radner (jradner@american.edu) Peggy Yocom (myocom@gmu.edu) Milbre Burch (milbre@kindcrone.com)
by S. Larson
Tuesday, March 1, 2016
CFP: Star Wars Panel 0 S. Larson The AFS New Directions in Folklore and Folk Narrative Sections are looking at co-sponsoring a panel on the role of Star Wars in American culture and in particular the relationship between Star Wars and folk studies. This was in part inspired by a Publore discussion a few months back on the transmission and ubiquity of Star Wars across generations. Depending on the interest level, this will either be a discussion panel or a Diamond Session, to help facilitate the consideration of various perspectives on the topic. If you are interested in participating, please email John Price at jprice172@gmail.com with an idea or perspective you would like to explore.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
CFP: AFS Medieval and Early Modern Section Sponsored Panels 0 S. Larson Interested scholars are invited to propose papers for panels sponsored by the Medieval and Early Modern Folklore section of the American Folklore Society, to be presented at the joint meeting of the American Folklore Society and ISFNR, to be held in Miami October 19-22, 2016. The section is organizing two panels at this year's meeting: "Into the Vale of Years”: Musings on "the Incomplete” on the 400th Anniversary of Shakespeare’s Passing: Papers are invited on the theme of the idea of incomplete/revised texts, the idea of the incomplete, etc. in the works of Shakespeare in this 400th anniversary of the poet’s passing.  "Tell My Story”: Musings on Narrative on the 400th Anniversary of Shakespeare’s Passing: Papers are invited on the theme of the idea of the construction of narrative, false narrative, etc. in the works of Shakespeare in this 400th anniversary of the poet’s passing.  Please send BOTH the short abstract (100 words) AND the long abstract (300) for your 15-20-minute paper to Kerry Kaleba at kerry.kaleba@gmail.com by March 25, 2016. Please also note your institutional affiliation (or status as an independent scholar), and presentation title, as well as an e-mail address or a phone number where you can be reached before March 31. If your proposal is accepted, you will need to complete and submit the AFS online registration form for a participant in an organized panel at www.afsnet.org by March 31, 2016.
by S. Larson
Tuesday, February 23, 2016
“Assignment America: Little Havana” 0 S. Larson Lizette Alvarez, "Assignment America: Little Havana,” The New York Times (December 23, 2015), http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/24/us/assignment-america-little-havana.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytco
by S. Larson
Monday, January 4, 2016
"The Seige of Miami: As temperatures rise, so, too, will sea levels" 0 L. Cashman Elizabeth Kolbert, "The Seige of Miami: As temperatures rise, so, too, will sea levels," The New Yorker (December 21, 2016), http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/12/21/the-siege-of-miami
by L. Cashman
Monday, January 4, 2016
“In Miami, the Brainy Side of the Beach” 0 S. Larson This recent New York Times article highlights Miami’s "brainy side,” showing that there is a lot more to the city than just a beach. Plenty of unique museums, music, and a graffiti district await if you plan to attend the 2016 AFS/ISFNR Joint Annual Meeting. Follow the link below to read more about what the city has to offer. Gulsac, Elaine. "In Miami, the Brainy Side of the Beach.” The New York Times, November 26, 2015: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/29/travel/art-basel-miami.html?smprod=nytcore-iphone&smid=nytcore-iphone-share&_r=0  
by S. Larson
Tuesday, December 1, 2015

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